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At the end of last year, Microsoft released a preview of Internet Explorer 10 for Windows 7, which was still buggy and wasn’t complete. Today, however, Microsoft has officially released IE10 for Windows 7. You can download the 32-bit or 64-bit versions from here. Eventually it will be rolled out through Windows Automatic Updates, and if you wish to block that update, you can run this little app to do so.

So, Windows 7 gets the new IE10 Chakra and JavaScript engines; the Touch API innovations that help drive the browser on Windows 8; the security measures built into IE10 — at least, the ones that are not dependent on Windows 8; location bar autocomplete; and an on-by-default Do Not Track header.

The standards that IE 10 adheres to are nothing to sneeze at. Microsoft claims that its labs have found the new version of the browser to be 20 percent faster on Windows 7 than IE 9, and it supports a veritable alphabet soup of HTML5 and CSS3 improvements — 60 percent more standards-compliant than IE 9, says Microsoft. These include CSS Text Shadow; CSS 3D Transforms; CSS3 Transitions and Animations; CSS3 Gradient; SVG Filter Effects; HTML5 Forms; input controls; validation; Web sockets; HTML5 Sandboxing; Web workers; HTML5 App Cache; File Reader API; and HTML5 Drag-drop, among other backend improvements.

In short, modern HTML5 sites that run smoothly in IE 10 on Windows 8, or the latest browsers from Chrome and Firefox, will now work properly in IE 10 on Windows 7.